Homeowners all over the country are looking to the warmth and comfort of spring with wide open arms this year and in the world of home remodeling it’s certainly making an impact. Exterior home remodels and upgrades from replacement entry doors, to a gorgeous new deck, to a new coat of paint, vinyl siding, or landscaping design are all being explored and planned in record numbers to make sure that as the weather gets nicer the neighbors get more envious.

With such a focus on exterior remodels like these it’s absolutely crucial to begin any work you’re doing on your curbside appeal from the most basic part of the entire lawn: the grass itself. This winter hit landscapes particularly hard around the country and for a lot of people that means that the best way to bring some life back to your lawn is to start fresh but there’s more to lawn laying than you may think. For years an ongoing debate has been raging over the best way to make sure the grass is always greener on your side of the fence with grass seed and grass sod becoming the clear front runners in the discussion. With that said, benefits and drawbacks are certainly to be found on both sides of the argument and ultimately the decision of which is better for your home is based on your own preferences. Consider these pros and cons of seed and sod and you’ll have a much easier time getting the yard your kids will love playing in and you’ll be proud displaying.

Lawn Seeding

Pros

  • Lawn seeding is, by far, the more affordable planting option
  • Natively grown seed grows deeper, stronger roots and are more durable
  • Much more expansive selection of breeds and mixes to customize look

Cons

  • Lawn seeding must be performed in early spring or early fall in order for the grass to thrive
  • Seeding takes much longer to exhibit a healthy, full lawn of grass
  • Reseeding may be needed if growth isn't uniform or attractive

Lawn Sod Installation

Pros

  • Beautiful green yard, achieved instantly with professional installation
  • Since it’s pre-grown, sod is available to be laid anytime of year
  • Very low chance of weed growth

Cons

  • Being professionally grown, sod is much more expensive to have installed
  • As grass is rooting, much more watering and care is needed
  • Rooting will typically not be as dependable as with natively grown seed
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